We live in a world with a rapidly growing population. This puts increasing pressure on our ecosystems to be able to support our energy demands, both for now and the future. And currently, we're not managing it well. Deforestation, overfishing and destruction of marine habitats, and desertification are not only having disastrous consequences on the environment and organisms that live there, but also on our ability to feed ourselves. Climate change and its associated ocean acidification are making conditions hostile for native and domesticated species. Unsustainable food practices damage the world as a whole, but also hurt us. Inequality is already present in our food systems, and it can get worse. Yet despite this, surplus food goes to waste, with as much as a third of food produced being discarded. This can happen before the food has even left the field, during processing as misshapen produce is thrown away, or in our own homes as we send uneaten food to landfill. 

Sustainable nutrition is seeking to find a balance between diets that nourish us physically, socially, and culturally without damaging the planet or creating further inequalities. The beauty of sustainable eating is that it is not one prescribed diet. Making sustainable choices can fit with a huge variety of preferences, tastes and ethics. Having the choice to change your diet is a privilege. I am very aware that in educating about sustainability it is important to recognise that not everyone can alter their diet to fit their ethics or sustainable guidelines. Different regions have different climates and agricultural frameworks that impact what makes for a sustainable diet. 
Explore more about what goes into making a sustainable diet, understanding seafood and more in the sustainable nutrition section.


Sustainable nutrition is where two of my greatest interests, and my degrees, come together. 

Sustainable Nutrition

"Health is not just about what you are eating. It's also about what you're thinking and saying."